Silver

Gold IRAs: What They Are, How They Work, and What Kind of Gold Goes Into Them

Although Rosland Capital does not provide investment or tax advice or the gold IRA itself, it does sell a range of IRA-eligible precious metals products. This includes gold, silver, platinum, and palladium in the form of coins and bars.

You’re probably familiar with traditional individual retirement accounts (IRAs), such as the SIMPLE IRA, SEP IRA, or Roth IRA, but did you know that you can add certain eligible gold products to a gold IRA? You can also add other precious metals to an IRA: silver, platinum, and palladium. 

Ever since the Great Recession that began in 2008, gold and other precious metals have enjoyed popularity and interest for holding value against market volatility and inflation. The quick recession and relative market volatility during the pandemic took the value of gold and other precious metals to record-breaking highs. 

It’s important to learn about gold IRAs and how they work because this can give you another tool for building and protecting the wealth you’ve built for retirement. Also, while many of the underlying rules for traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs also apply to precious metal IRAs, there are some crucial differences. Let’s take a look at what a gold IRA is, how it compares to traditional and Roth IRAs, and what kinds of gold and other precious metals you can contribute to an IRA.

What is a Gold IRA? How is it different from a traditional IRA?

A pile of gold bars.

Gold IRAs are individual retirement accounts into which the IRS allows the account owner to place and hold physical gold. Other precious metals IRAs include a platinum IRA, palladium IRA, and silver IRA. Only these four precious metals — gold, silver, palladium, and platinum — are eligible for inclusion in these unique, self-directed IRAs. 

With precious metals IRAs, the account owner typically exercises greater control in choosing which eligible assets to include in his or her accounts. This is compared to traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs, which are typically established through an employer and managed by a qualified financial professional who uses account owners’ contributions to buy pre-selected collections of stocks, bonds, and mutual funds chosen by their brokerage firm.  

Most people are more familiar with traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs. Traditional individual retirement accounts take different forms to appeal to different employment situations and financial goals. Some of the most common types of IRAs include:

  1. SIMPLE IRAs — a Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) IRA is a form of traditional IRA retirement account that employers with under 100 employees can establish for employees. Employers must either offer a 3% matching contribution of the employee’s pay or a 2% nonelective contribution regardless of whether the employee contributed to the IRA or not.
  2. SEP IRAs — a Simplified Employee Pension Plan (SEP) IRA can be established by an employer of any size for an employee, but a SEP IRA is often used by self-employed individuals and freelancers because only the employer contributes to the account.
  3. Roth IRAs — these follow most of the same rules for other traditional IRAs, except for a few differences regarding contributions, tax rules, and distribution of funds. 

These kinds of IRAs only allow owners to contribute paper assets. In this case, paper assets include cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and other representations of wealth, as opposed to hard assets or physical assets such as physical precious metals or real estate.

A few similarities between traditional IRAs and precious metals IRAs include:

  • Tax benefits and incentives to encourage saving for retirement
  • Annual contribution limits 
  • Penalties of up to 25% for early withdrawal

A big difference between traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs compared to precious metals IRAs is that you can contribute physical gold, silver, platinum, and palladium to precious metals IRAs. This means you can purchase and hold approved gold bullion products in your gold IRA, for example. You can also roll over existing traditional IRAs into precious metals IRAs. This process involves converting paper assets into physical assets. Eligible precious metals include bullion in the form of coins and bars.

What Kind of Gold Can I Put In My Gold IRA?

The IRS describes the kinds of gold and other precious metals eligible to contribute to your gold, silver, platinum, or palladium IRA. IRA-eligible forms include “any gold, silver, platinum, or palladium of a fineness equal to or exceeding the minimum fineness that a contract market requires for metals which may be delivered in satisfaction of a regulated futures contract.” 

The following gold, silver, and palladium bullion coins are among the IRA-eligible precious metals products:

How Does a Precious Metal IRA Work and How Do I Start One?

The biggest difference about how gold IRAs work compared to traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs is that you need to have the physical precious metal. Most IRAs use a digital account indicating that you own a certain amount of stock. It’s important to be aware of the rules for storage of the precious metals you contribute. 

These metals must be stored and maintained by a trustee or custodian approved by the IRS in an approved depository. You can’t simply keep your gold and silver coins and platinum bars in a safe at home or in a safety deposit box and call it an IRA. This may lead to early withdrawal penalties.  

No one likes the idea of paying fees to store and maintain the physical precious metals for an IRA. But there can be value in diversifying a portfolio funding their retirement account. When market volatility and worries about inflation, interest rates, and the national debt threaten, it’s hard to put a price on the peace of mind that comes from taking steps to help guard your wealth and your future financial security.

I cannot overemphasize the need to do thorough research into the different kinds of IRAs available. Research and determine which option or options may be right for you. For example, begin with some basics such as researching spot prices and tips for buying gold and other precious metals. Then I encourage you to investigate the finer points about how gold IRAs and other precious metals IRAs work. Understand what fees may be involved.  Get more information about gold IRAs and IRA-eligible precious metals products from Rosland Capital.

5 Popular Precious Metal Mints and Brands

Choosing the right precious metals company when you’re buying bullion bars and coins is an important and sometimes difficult task. The stakes are high. You want to ensure that the precious metals products you buy are authentic and high quality. This is your hard-earned money we’re talking about. 

You’ve probably noticed that the number of mints and brands offering precious metal bullion, whether as bars or coins, is vast and sometimes confusing. Did you know that some mints are government-operated, and some are privately owned and operated? And did you know that both types of mints are among the most popular and reliable? 

Let’s start with the basic definition of a mint, and then we’ll move on to the most popular precious metals mints or brands. 

What does mint mean when referring to coins, money, and precious metals? 

Most of us think of the refreshing green leaves used to flavor chewing gum, breath fresheners, and drinks like mojitos and mint juleps. Of course, we mean a very different kind of mint.

According to the Rosland Capital glossary, a mint is an establishment in which coins are produced. Mint is also used as a grading term.

As mentioned earlier, governments operate some mints and private companies own and operate some. Because trust and integrity are essential to creating and maintaining the value of minted precious metals products, each mint places its own mint mark on its offerings. Let’s look again at the Rosland Capital glossary, which says that a mint mark is the “mark on a coin identifying the mint at which it was struck.” This functions as both accountability and a promise of high quality for each mint’s brand reputation.

In the early days of the US Mint, mint marks were unnecessary because the first Mint in Philadelphia was the only one. Mint marks first appeared on US coins when other Mint branches opened in Charlotte, Dahlonega, and New Orleans in 1838. Even after that, the Mint in Philadelphia was not required to mark its coins until 1942. 

A brief history of minted coins

Human beings have used currency since we started exchanging goods and services. Historians say that the Lydians, from a kingdom located in what is Turkey today, first minted coins around 600 B.C., using an alloy of silver and gold called electrum

This new coinage made exchange easier for merchants traveling through diverse societies in varying climates, cultures, and values, opening greater possibilities for exchange beyond the barter system. A modern comparison might be giving someone a gift card they can use anywhere and for almost anything, rather than guessing what kind of specific gift they might like, want, or need — and getting it wrong.

Early modern coin minting grew more sophisticated. Some coins were pressed by rolling blanks through a machine. Other coins were ingots, meaning molten metal was poured into molds and allowed to cool and solidify.  

Today, all kinds of coins and bars are minted for a variety of uses, from authorized circulated currency to uncirculated currency such as bullion coins to coins or tokens used for arcade games or bus fare. Mints produce coins, bars, and other products from a variety of precious metals such as silver, gold, platinum, palladium, and rhodium.

Let’s take a look at some of the most popular precious metals brands or mints.

5 of the Most Popular Precious Metal Companies

PAMP

PAMP logo with 1-ounce gold bar

Founded: 1977

Mint type: Private

Perhaps one of the most well-known and popular mints, PAMP is a private mint that was established in 1977, and is based in Ticino, Switzerland. PAMP operates a precious metals refinery and fabrication facility, where it produces a wide range of products, including bullion coins and bars minted from gold, silver, and Platinum Group Metals (PGM), in a variety of sizes, shapes, purities, and weights. PAMP products are accredited as Good Delivery by all major precious metals authorities, including the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA). 

PAMP also supplies a diverse range of metal products to consumers, industries, governments, banks, and other institutions. The most popular product among consumers is the 1-ounce Lady Fortuna rectangular pure gold bar ingot at .9999 (four nines) gold fineness. PAMP offers bars ranging in weight from 1 ounce to 1 kilogram in precious metals including silver, gold, platinum, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium. 


United States (US) Mint

Logo of the United States Mint

Founded: 1792

Mint type: Government

Perhaps the United States Mint is the kind of minting operation you had in mind: one operated by the government to issue the country’s coinage for circulation. The US Mint was founded in 1792, and currently has minting locations in  Denver, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and West Point. According to the Mint, it is the “sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage and is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the nation to conduct its trade and commerce.”

In addition to authorized coinage for circulation, the US Mint produces many other coin-related products such as proof, uncirculated, and commemorative coins, as well as Congressional Gold Medals. The most popular offerings from the US Mint include silver and gold bullion coins and the American Eagle gold. Many taxpayers will be happy to learn that the Mint is self-sustaining through its programs and operates at no cost to taxpayers. Legend has it that George Washington contributed some of his own silver to get the Mint started.


Royal Canadian Mint

Logo of the Royal Canadian Mint

Founded: 1908

Mint type: Government

Founded in Ottawa, Canada, the Royal Canadian Mint produces over one billion coins annually. The Canadian Silver Maple Leaf coin is the RCM’s most popular bullion offering. The Royal Canadian Mint has developed various technologies to protect the integrity of its bullion offerings. 

Bullion DNA™ Anti-Counterfeiting Technology uses a digital authentication process for Gold and Silver Maple Leaf coins. Mintshield™ Surface Protection is said to reduce white spots on Silver Maple Leaf bullion coins. 

The circulation presses in Winnipeg can produce 20 million coins each day, or 750 coins per second. In 2007, the Mint created the largest coin in the world, a 100 kilogram, 99.999% pure, $1 million gold bullion coin. 

According to the RCM, “The Mint’s high-tech plant in Winnipeg produces over 1 billion circulation coins each year. The Mint produces limited-mintage numismatic coins honouring major national achievements and themes. Crafted of gold, silver or platinum, the Mint’s collector coins are individually handled as they enter the presses. A single coin may be struck up to three times to achieve a crisp, flawless impression. Certain coins feature the Mint’s proprietary technologies: double holograms, selective plating, colouring or laser enhancement.”


Perth Mint

Logo of The Perth Mint, Australia

Founded: 1899

Mint type: Government

The Perth Mint, founded in 1899 in Perth, Australia, was originally built to refine metal from the gold rushes in Western Australia, as well as distribute sovereigns and half-sovereigns for the British Empire. 

Accredited by five of the major gold exchanges and serving customers ranging from individuals to sovereign wealth funds, the Perth Mint offers “an array of bullion and collectable legal tender coins, bars and medallions each year. We are proud to showcase Australia’s icons to the world and celebrate a variety of popular universal themes, through the original artistry of our coin designs and creative concepts.”

Some of the Perth Mint’s signature products include the Australian Kookaburra, Koala, and Kangaroo bullion coins. Some recent offerings pay homage to pop culture, such as the Star Wars™ Clone Trooper™ Helmet-Shaped 2021 2oz Silver Proof, the Jurassic World 2021 2oz T.Rex-Shaped Silver Antiqued Coin, the SUPERMAN™ Shield 2021 1oz Silver Proof Coin, and the James Bond GoldenEye 25th Anniversary 2020 1oz Silver Proof Coin. Other coins celebrate the unique Australian ecosystem and wildlife such as the Great Barrier Reef and the famous marsupials from down under: kangaroos, quokkas, and koalas. 

Check out this 2 kilo .9999 silver Australian Koala coin:


Sunshine Minting

Logo for Sunshine Minting, Inc.

Founded: 1979

Mint type: Private

Sunshine Minting, Inc., founded in Idaho in 1979, mints over 70 million ounces of bullion each year. Among them, SMI offers its version of the popular Silver Buffalo Round. In addition to striking its own collector bullion coins, Sunshine Minting serves as the primary supplier of 1-ounce silver planchets — the round metal blanks ready to be struck as coins — to the United States Mint for the .9995 American Silver Eagle bullion coin. SMI also supplies precious metal blanks to private mints. 

However, SMI sells to a varied and diverse range of customers, including governments, financial institutions, corporations, marketing companies, other businesses, and private groups. According to SMI, its “minting operation is geared to manufacture products to industry standards in brilliant uncirculated (BU), proof-like or proof quality.” 

Although it can provide platinum blanks, SMI specializes in the fine gold and fine silver varieties, ranging in size from 1 gram to large 100-ounce bars. SMI also offers services for designing and producing custom creations from any silver, gold, platinum, or non-precious metal minted product.

Finding a Precious Metals Mint to Anchor Your Asset Portfolio

How do you decide which mint and which precious metal products are right for you? That depends on your unique situation. Vital first steps include understanding your goals and doing thorough research. You may end up with more questions than answers at first. But we’re here to help you make an informed decision, whether you want to know how to buy gold or any other precious metal.

Get more information from the precious metals representatives at Rosland Capital.

Rosland Capital at Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

What’s the Difference Between Bullion and Numismatic Coins?

Is there a difference between bullion coins and numismatic coins? Yes, and when you’re in the market for coins, it’s important to know what you’re looking for and why you’re looking for it. Bullion coins and numismatic coins are different types of coins that are valued differently and for different reasons.

For some coins, you may be more interested in mintage and coin grading from grading services such as NGC and PCGS than in the price of gold or market value of silver bullion coins.

But there’s still some overlap, especially when considering well-known eagle coins like gold eagles that are minted from physical gold planchets, or silver eagles that have high silver content, both of which are impacted by precious metals prices as well as their mintage and collectible value. This can leave you asking, “How much is a gold coin?” The answer is: It depends on what kind of gold coin you mean. So, before you commit to working with any coin dealers, let’s explore the differences and the similarities, and what that may mean for you.

What is bullion?

What does the word “bullion” make you think of? Do you imagine the huge rectangular gold bullion bars stacked like bricks in a vault at Fort Knox? You’re not wrong. But that’s only part of the picture. Bullion coins are minted using those same highly refined precious metals such as silver, gold, platinum, and palladium. 

As Rosland Capital’s Precious Metals & Coins Glossary (by kind permission of Lorenz Books, publishers of one of our favorite books, The World Encyclopedia of Coins, written by Dr. James Mackay) succinctly states: “Bullion is precious metal whose value is reckoned solely by its weight and fineness.”

Regardless of the shape or size, bullion is all about the purity of the metal itself. Precious metal purity is graded according to millesimal fineness, or parts per thousand, and the standard varies by metal. For example, an assayer certifies the grade of fine silver only for silver bullion with a millesimal fineness of 999, or 999 parts per thousand. This translates to 99.9% pure silver. The same purity standard holds for gold bullion. This level of purity is called 24-karat gold, though that term is most commonly used with jewelry.

According to London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) purity standards for Good Delivery, platinum and palladium bullion must meet the minimum requirement of 99.95% pure platinum or palladium. Although we know that gold is mined along with other precious metals such as platinum to be used in jewelry, electronics, and sustainable energy industries, coins remain one of the most popular forms and uses. All these precious metals are available as bullion coins. Which brings us to our main question.

What’s the difference between bullion coins, numismatic coins, and semi-numismatic coins?

What is a bullion coin?

Again, to quote the Glossary, a bullion coin is a coin struck in precious metal, now usually with an inscription giving its weight and fineness, whose value fluctuates according to the market price of the metal.

Some of the most popular bullion coins include ones minted in the U.S., Canada, South Africa, Austria, and the United Kingdom:

It is worth noting that different bullion coins can have different metal content. For example, the American Buffalo is 99.99 fine gold, while the American Eagle is 91.67% pure gold. The Eagle still contains 1 Troy oz of gold, because it weighs 33.931 grams, or around 1.09 Troy ounces.

As long as a bullion coin’s gold content and weight are known, and the issuing authority—in this case the US Mint—is trusted, these variances are of no import.

Although bullion coins are not now meant for use as currency, they are issued by a sovereign nation, have a legal tender value and could theoretically be used for purchases. The fact that the legal tender value is a small fraction of the metal content’s worth discourages that sort of activity.

You may also come across “rounds” that have the same metal content as a bullion coin of the same weight, but these are not legal tender coins whose production is authorized by a sovereign government.

While bullion coins can be seen to have a functional, transactional purpose, they are not immune to the tides of fashion. Before the US Buffalo coin was introduced, the Canadian Gold Maple Leaf, promoted as ’24-karat,’ was a particularly popular purchase. The arrival of the Buffalo, with its nostalgic use of the Buffalo Nickel design, and its homage to the incuse lettering of the $2.5 and $5 Indian Head coins, created a new favorite.

What are numismatic coins?

What does numismatic mean? 

Let’s check with our Glossary again. It says: “Numismatics (from Latin numisma, coin) is the study and collection of paper money, coins and medals.”

According to the American Numismatic Association (ANA), numismatists study money in any of its forms, often focusing on certain areas of numismatics, such as coins, tokens, or paper currency. For our purposes here, numismatics relates to coins. This often involves an interest in coins as currency, as part of human histories, cultures, and societies. 

Numismatic coins are essentially coins that are no longer in production, are in limited supply and, in the case of US coins, were minted before 1933. They were usually minted as bullion for use as currency and as a medium of exchange. They only acquired their ‘numismatic’ status later, once they became part of history.

One example would be the beautiful $2.5 and $5 Indian Head coins first issued in 1908. These have a recessed, or “incuse” design, and were initially not popular—people thought germs might hide in the crevices—but now they are beloved collectors’ items.

Coin buyers also seek coins minted up to present day, especially limited or special editions, sets such as the U.S. quarters featuring the fifty states, and the now-rare first euros released by each state that joined the European Union prior to standardizing the currency across nations. The scarcity of coins stamped with errors will always be a source of attraction and fascination for numismatists.

That’s not to say that value is unimportant. On the contrary, the value of numismatic and semi-numismatic coins can sometimes greatly exceed that of bullion coins with the same metal content. One difference between bullion coins and numismatic coins is what gives each its value. As we’ve seen, bullion coins are valued for their precious metal content and weight, whereas numismatic coin values also derive from factors such as rarity, historical context and importance, condition, and current demand for a particular coin.

The most valuable numismatic and semi-numismatic coins are worth far more than the spot price for their inherent metal value. One of the most famous numismatic coins is the United States $20 double eagle gold coin. This U.S. gold coin was the result of a collaboration between President Theodore Roosevelt and American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. While visiting the Smithsonian and seeing the ancient Greek coins bearing the image of Alexander the Great, Roosevelt had the idea to reinvent American coinage, introducing a higher caliber of artistic quality. Mission accomplished.

What are semi-numismatic coins?

While “numismatic coins” can be defined as older coins that are no longer made, semi-numismatic coins can still be in production. Along with “First Strikes”, semi-numismatic coins can include proof coins, which are specially minted coins produced in limited runs by some of the most popular mints and precious metals brands. These coins are usually double or triple struck and placed into protective casings without being touched by human hands or placed into circulation, leaving them in “mint condition” without scratch or blemish. 

Proof coins will have a highly polished mirror background, with their design rendered in frosted finishes, giving a cameo-like appearance – they are visibly different and often much more appealing than their mass-produced bullion cousins.

These uncirculated, collectible coins are often of the same metal content as bullion coins while also being relatively rare and unusual, and they draw value from both of these aspects. 

For example, the American Eagle Gold Proof, produced in limited quantities by the US Mint, is a popular item with coin enthusiasts, while the “Uncirculated” version of the same coin is minted in much larger quantities, and would be described as a bullion coin.

In general, semi-numismatic coins can add unexpected character and value to your portfolio. They are also available in a greater variety of sizes compared to coins designed for circulation.

Is it better to buy bullion coins or numismatic coins?

There’s no one answer to that question—it depends on your goals. Whatever you choose, it often makes sense to diversify your holdings and help solidify your portfolio. If you’re thinking about buying precious metals, whether gold, silver, or others contact our precious metals specialists at Rosland Capital.

rows of solar panels in a green field

Precious Metals and Sustainable Energy

What Is the Connection Between Precious Metals and Sustainable Energy?

Many of us have heard about sustainable energy, from solar energy to hydrogen fuel to renewable resources. But did you know that alternative energy sources and precious metals are deeply intertwined? In fact, the demand for renewable energy sources plays a prominent role in the demand for precious metals.

So, what does gold have to do with solar power? How does silver drive the electric vehicle industry? What does platinum have to do with hydrogen fuel cells? In this article, I’ll explain the many ways that gold, silver, platinum, and palladium are playing an important role in green energy research.

Gold, Silver, and Sustainable Energy

For millennia, nearly every culture in the world has mined gold and silver for various purposes. Besides their most common uses — such as jewelry or medical devices — gold and silver also have enjoyed a variety of “magical” applications throughout history, particularly for ancient and medieval alchemy. 

Although spinning gold into something else might seem like the stuff of fairy tales, researchers have been able to use gold as a catalyst to turn solar energy into methane and methanol. Well-known for its high conductivity, silver, too, has emerged as a key ingredient in the development of solar technologies. When used in the form of a paste in solar cells, silver helps conduct electrons from sunlight and the resulting electrical energy that can be used immediately or stored in batteries. 

Additionally, silver plays a vital role in the electric vehicle (EV) industry, which is growing rapidly. According to McKinsey, 143 new EVs were launched in 2019 and automakers plan on launching 450 additional models by 2022. From the electric engine to the battery pack to the batter management system, silver is necessary for EVs to operate. Gold, too, is used for the circuit boards of EVs. 

A global authority on precious metals, the London Bullion Market Association predicts that the demand for silver in the auto industry will increase 246% by 2040 — from a little more than 1,300 metric tons in 2015 to more than 4,500 metric tons in 2040. Although the amount of silver and gold may be small from car to car, the aggregate total is notable and will only expand the importance and value of these precious metals. 

Platinum, Palladium, and Renewable Energy

Discovered in 1735, platinum is known for its brilliant shine and durability and is used in everything from dental tools to jewelry.

Platinum’s cousin palladium isn’t known as widely for its white luster as it is for its use in the automotive industry where it’s used to turn toxic pollutants into water vapor and less-harmful carbon dioxide. In recent years, the demand for palladium has grown thanks to research into its applications in alternative energy. In fact, although palladium isn’t used in electric car production, the demand for palladium in hybrid cars is on the rise.

Groundbreaking uses for platinum and palladium are emerging as scientists investigate how to shift from a fossil fuel-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy. Both metals are excellent candidates for use as catalysts in hydrogen fuel cells, because of their excellent conductivity. Platinum and palladium make it possible to turn hydrogen into an efficient, powerful, and sustainable fuel source. This potential makes platinum and palladium the standouts among the precious metals for green technologies.

Driven by Precious Metals, the Future Is Green

Although we can’t be sure what the future holds, all signs point toward more industries “going green” at a rapid clip. As interest in sustainability grows, innovative uses for precious metals will only drive demand. If you’re interested in learning more about precious metals, including gold and silver, visit RoslandCapital.com.

How to Research Gold Spot Prices

If you’re considering buying gold or other precious metals, it’s important to understand what “spot prices” are. Unfortunately, this term, along with other industry terms like “bid/ask spread,” “good delivery,” and “troy ounces” can confuse buyers. Don’t worry, it’s not as complicated as it seems! 

Rosland Capital has published a new blog article that breaks down these concepts. Ready to get started? Read the “How to Research Gold Spot Prices” blog article to learn more.

Marin Aleksov Unveils 5kg Coin at Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

Rosland Capital CEO Marin Aleksov was present at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix Friday, November 25 to showcase the latest addition of the Officially Licensed Formula 1 Coin Collection. Aleksov revealed a 5 kilogram gold coin, the most impressive addition to the collection, to reporters and Formula 1 fans in the Paddock Club. Licensed by Stunt & Co and minted by Swiss-based PAMP, the collection also included gold and silver 5oz coins and a .25oz gold coin celebrating the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.

“We knew we had to deliver something special to the Paddock Club here in Abu Dhabi and our glorious 5kg Gold Coin certainly delivers on that front. It is literally one-of-a-kind and quite simply spectacular,” said Aleksov. “Furthermore, our new 5-ounce Gold and Silver Coins are a welcome addition to our portfolio while we are also delighted to add the special edition one-quarter ounce Abu Dhabi Grand Prix gold coin to our growing collection of bespoke F1 race weekend coins.”

The collection also includes all 21 Formula 1 circuit names on 2.5oz gold and silver coins and a gold 1kg coin. In addition to the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, the collection also celebrates many of the other very well-known races, including the British, Italian, United States and Brazil Grand Prix.  

You can find more information about the Rosland Capital coin collection here.

 

More photos from the event can be found on Rosland Capital’s Instagram.

Rosland Capital to Distribute Official Formula 1® Coin Collection

Rosland Capital recently announced global distribution of an Official Formula 1® gold and silver coin collection, in celebration of the the FIA Formula One World Championship as well as the British, Italy, the United States and Brazil Grand Prix races. Available in the United States and in the United Kingdom, the front of each of these limited series coins includes a Formula 1® car, the name of the event and the Formula 1® logo. Gold coins celebrating the British Grand Prix™, which will be held July 8-10, 2016, became available on June 15.

The collection also features limited single gold and silver coins with all 21 Formula 1 circuit names printed on the front and includes a certificate number, statement of metal fineness, weight, proof of quality statement, and signature of the PAMP assayer.

The back of each coin in the collection features Ian Rank-Broadley’s portrait of Queen Elizabeth II along with the legal tender value of the coin.

“We are honored to be working with our friends at Stunt & Co. on this endeavor,” said Marin Aleksov, Chief Executive Officer of LA-based Rosland Capital LLC. “The coins are not only a way to celebrate the races, but also a unique keepsake for coin collectors and Formula One fans alike. The history of the races are truly brought to life in the coin series.”

The collection is minted by Swiss-based PAMP and is in association with the global license-holders, Stunt & Co. Ltd. Go to https://www.roslandcapital.com/f1 for more information about the collection or check out more about the Formula 1® Collection from Rosland Capital on Coin Week and on Coin World.

First Look: Silver

Rosland Capital’s new silver commercial spot has been completed. Get a first look below as William Devane discusses how silver can benefit your net wealth!

Rosland Capital Donates More than 12K to the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross announced on Thursday that Rosland Capital’s October fundraising program benefitting the Red Cross raised $12,502. Crediting precious metal enthusiasts and Red Cross supporters, Rosland Capital called the Red Cross an “ideal partner” and expects the funds to have a strong impact on the community.

In October, Rosland Capital donated $1 for every historic silver peace dollar numismatic coin that it sold, with an emphasis on the service and armed forces programs.

Julie Thomas, Executive Director of Red Cross’ Santa Monica Chapter said, “This gift will help the Red Cross provide critical services with a caring touch to men and women in all branches of the United States military, active duty personnel, reservists and members of the National Guard and their families. Thank you, Rosland Capital.”

William Devane’s Spot Promoting the Silver Maple Leaf for Charity

Rosland Capital released their latest television ad this week featuring spokesman William Devane. The spot highlights the Rosland Capital partnership with Fisher House Foundation and Valour Place. Each sale of a silver maple leaf coin will result in a $1 donation to Fisher House and Valour Place.